Monday, May 6, 2013

Fire and chocolate

Did you ever go to the store to get one thing and end up coming home with something completely different? This weekend we went to Home Depot to get screws for the dining room table and paint for the basement floor. I forgot the screws and decided to wait on the paint after we got this.

I've been looking at fire pit pictures and DIYs for a while. Some of them are too rich for my blood (Katie Bower's is beautiful, but $260 isn't in my budget) but then I saw one that was more in my wheel house.

Click the picture for the link. Theirs was $55, but ours was closer to $20 because we had pavers and rocks and I forgot to buy capstones. So basically we only bought 16 concrete blocks. Now, my dad swears that concrete block fire pits are bad and will explode, but according to the Lowes website (the post at the link says it and I checked too) the blocks are fire resistant. A backyard fire with just sticks and leaves isn't likely to get hot enough to do anything. B started a fire and let it burn for a while, and no explosions, so that's good enough for me. As always, keep a hose or pitcher of water nearby when you're playing with fire.

The process was a mixture of Bower Power's and The Dirty Loft's. Clear an area of grass, level it, lay pavers down, level them, stack pavers, fill pavers with gravel (or river rock, in our case), put a layer of river rock inside the fire pit, light something on fire. If I'd remembered to pick up construction adhesive I would have had B use it between the blocks, but I didn't. The rocks are keeping everything weighted and together instead. Brian at The Dirty Loft said he used one row of blocks, but we preferred two. Hopefully when I remember to get the capstones on it won't be too tall.

And, of course, we made s'mores.

Hope you had a fun weekend, too!

10 comments:

  1. Ive been dying to make one in my backyard too! What you guys made is just perfect... and thanks now im hungry for smores!

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    Replies
    1. Do you have to put pavers underneath it ?

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    2. I suppose you could put gravel under it, but I'm not sure if dirt would work. It does need some sort of hard surface, I think. I didn't want it on the concrete patio, because in my extensive search to find out if this would explode, the only explosion story I found was of a firepit built on poured concrete exploding. (The moisture built up under the concrete and expanded to steam, if I remember right.)

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    3. Gravel instead of pavers, I mean.

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  2. Olá, adorei a ideia com os blocos de cimento...

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  3. Replies
    1. We never really had too much of an issue with ashes, but if they got too high B would just take a small shovel (it was a small pit, so we even used the garden trowel once or twice) and scoop them out.

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  4. I'm wondering if the pit wouldn't burn better with some ventilation on the bottom? Most burn can's etc. have venting.

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    Replies
    1. We wondered if that would become an issue, but it never did. I think it was because our blocks were dry stacked and there were small gaps between a few of them. Also, it's not very tall, so the oxygen didn't have to go very far down.

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  5. This is pretty awesome; definitely pinning this so I can make this in the next few weeks!!

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